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Seasonal Tires

Being prepared for every season

There are driving hazards with every season. Preparing your car for each season can help you enjoy driving all year long, no matter what the weather.

Be prepared for all types of weather

If you’re going on a long journey, check your tires before you leave. Make sure you have a healthy tread depth – this means at least the legal minimum of 1.6mm – and that your tires are correctly inflated. Don’t forget to check your spare, too.

In some countries, it’s mandatory to keep first aid kids and warning triangles in your car at all times. It’s also important to carry an emergency kit with flares, a bottle of water, jumper cables, a blanket, a high-visibility vest, paper towels, a torch, an in-car mobile phone charger, and washer fluid. If you experience extreme cold or snow where you live, also bring some spare clothes and blankets. Your local automobile organization can inform you of legal requirements for vehicle emergency kits in your area.

Driving in summer

Driving in summer

Develop a simple maintenance habit and take a few precautions, and you’ll be ready for just about any challenge summer driving brings.

Swap your winter tires for summer ones

Swap your winter tires for summer ones

If you change your tires seasonally, remove your winter tires and fit your summer ones once the temperatures are regularly above 10 °C. Your summer tires are designed to perform on wet or dry roads in mild weather. Once you’ve removed your winter tires, be sure to store them correctly. They should be on their sides and kept in special storage bags. Your dealer may be able to help you with off-season storage.

Maintain fluid levels

Maintain fluid levels

It’s important to keep the fluids in your vehicle at the right levels. You might even consider using a slightly thicker oil compound for summer, which can better withstand the heat.
Carry out regular checks of windshield wiper fluid, coolant, and brake fluid.

Keep the correct tire pressure

Keep the correct tire pressure

Warm weather means that your tires lose pressure in summer at twice the rate they do in winter. Be sure to check your tire pressure more often as temperatures rise.
Underinflated tires generate more heat as they roll. Driving on them reduces your fuel economy.

Check your battery life

Check your battery life

Summer temperatures sometimes mean your battery works harder, especially if you’ve had it for a few years. It’s a good idea to have a professional check it. It might just need a recharge, or it could be time for a new one.

Prepare for challenging weather

Prepare for challenging weather

Summer weather can be rough, too. Heavy rains, fog, strong winds, and even extreme weather like hurricanes and tornadoes can all be part of the warmer months. Be ready to deal with skids, and learn about making steering corrections in strong winds.

Driving in winter

Driving in winter

If you prepare for winter weather – including emergencies – before the temperatures start to drop, you can enjoy every journey in the colder months. Even if your winters are too mild for ice and snow, you should still prepare for winter emergencies.

Fit winter tires

Fit winter tires

It’s a good idea to use a dedicated winter tire if you get anything more than a light occasional snowfall in winter, or if your temperatures are frequently below 7 °C. Summer tires are less suitable on winter roads, but a winter tire can help your car perform all through the colder months.

Check brakes, defroster, and heater

Check brakes, defroster, and heater

Your brake performance is vital all year, and especially in the colder months. Make sure to check them before you hit the winter roads. Be ready for cold morning starts by checking your defroster and heater.

Maintain antifreeze and wiper fluid levels

Maintain antifreeze and wiper fluid levels

Be sure to use a wiper fluid made to get you through winter, and keep an eye on the level. It might be a good idea to get a fresh set of wiper blades before winter begins, so you’ll be ready to clear ice and snow from the windshield. Look after your coolant system by keeping track of your antifreeze. The system should contain a 50/50 water-to-antifreeze ratio. Get it checked at a local garage or buy a tester kit.

Change to winter grade oil

Change to winter grade oil

The thicker oil you might be using for summer months is less suitable in winter. You can get winter grade oil that will help ready you for cold starts on winter mornings. Have your oil changed before the temperatures drop.

Give your vehicle a rinse

Give your vehicle a rinse

Winter roads are made safer with salt and chemicals, but these can corrode your vehicle over time. You’ll also want to maintain visibility by keeping windshield and windows clean. Wash your vehicle down regularly, especially if you start to notice any buildup.

Drive safely and slow down

Drive safely and slow down

Leave extra time for each journey so you can drive more slowly on slippery roads or in bad weather. It’s important to give other vehicles plenty of room on the road, so don’t get too close to the vehicle in front of you. Even well maintained roads bring slippery snow and ice, so learn how to handle skids.